Delta 4 Medium Makes Penultimate Launch

John Kraus photos
A great image taken by John Kraus of the Delta 4’s main booster and four smaller boosters, and the awesome power they produce. Visit his patreon to find more! Credit: John Kraus

Just after midnight, 00:23 UTC on March 16th 2019, a Delta 4 medium rocket placed a US military network relay satellite into orbit. Launching from Space Launch Complex 37B at Cape Canaveral AFB in Florida, the 66 meter tall Delta 4 is nearing retirement, with this being its second to last launch. After several technical issues, the ground teams eventually got the rocket and the satellite tracking network functioning correctly. The hydrogen fueled RS-68A main engine ignited moments before liftoff for 5 seconds before the hold down bolts released at T-0, firing away with 1.8 million pounds of thrust. This mission has extended ULA’s streak of successful missions to 133 since its inception in 2006.

Marcus Cote
Maybe the photo of the night by Marcus Cote, showing the huge exhaust plume created by the Delta 4 in 5, 4 configuration. Credit: Marcus Cote
marcus cote
A great time lapse of the Delta 4 launching WGS10 satellite into a geostationary orbit. Credit: Marcus Cote.

The rocket veered towards an easterly direction over the Atlantic Ocean, aiming to place the communications satellite to its final operating position 36,000 km (22,000 miles) above the equator in geostationary orbit. The solid rocket boosters burned out and were jettisoned in pairs roughly 1 minute and 40 seconds into flight. The main engine continued to fly on until 4 minutes in when the first stage was cut off, and then released shortly after. The first stage then fell back to Earth into the Atlantic Ocean. The upper stage was powered by a RL10B-2 engine, made by Aerojet Rocketdyne, the same manufacturers of the main engine. The upper stage engine ignited twice to push the satellite into an elliptical transfer orbit. The satellite separated from the second stage at T+36 minutes 50 seconds.

ULA
An image showing the scary power of the rocket boosters at liftoff, the rocket firing 1.8 million pounds of thrust into the ground trying to escape the Earth. Credit: ULA.

On board was the WGS 10 military communications satellite. It is a 6000kg (13,200 lb) broadband satellite, that is joining nine others that have been slowly placed in orbit since 2007. The idea is to form a globe spanning network that can relay video, data and other useful information between the battlefield and the headquarters, wherever they may be. The WGS fleet transmits both classified and unclassified information, and supports the US and its allies. On board is a digital channelizer that allows the satellite to relay signals using high data-rate X-band and Ka-band frequencies during its 14 year expected life. All of the WGS satellites were launched on ULA rockets, with the first two on Atlas V’s and all the rest on Delta 4’s. This mission had an estimated price tag of $400 million.

Glen Davis
An almost artistic image of the Delta 4 medium launching. Heavily edited, but still capturing that raw power. Credit: Glen Davis

Marking the second to last flight of the Delta 4 Medium variant rocket, it is noticeable as only having a single first stage core, whereas the Delta 4 Heavy has three. ULA are retiring certain areas of their launch family as they plan to debut the new Vulcan booster soon which will apparently be cheaper than their current offering. The decision to halt selling of the Delta 4 medium flight was made in 2014, but this and the next launch were already on the books at that time. The Delta 4 medium is apparently more expensive than the Atlas V launcher, but with a similar launch capability, leading to the reason for retirement. ULA described it as it being cheaper to run a few launchers more frequently than many launchers sporadically. The bigger Delta 4 heavy will continue to launch heavier payloads well into the mid 2020’s. Another reason for keeping the Delta 4 Medium was to allow the US military to have two choices to launch their payloads, that and the Atlas V. Now that the Falcon 9 is cleared to fly military satellites there is less need for the Delta variant.

marcus cote
The Delta 4 sitting on the pad, ready to launch the WGS10 satellite. Taken close up by Marcus cote the day before when setting up the remote cameras for the launch. Credit: Marcus Cote.
mike seely
A behind the scenes photo of setting up cameras before the launch. Credit: Mike Seeley.

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.

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The 50th Flight of the Falcon 9

Awe inspiring Falcon 9 Photo
A truly awe inspiring photo Of the Falcon 9’s 50th flight. From the SpaceX Flickr.

At 05:33 UTC on March 6th 2018 SpaceX launched it’s 50th Falcon 9 mission. The version 1.2 Falcon 9, with a brand new “Block 4” variant booster B1044, lifted off from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40. On board, inside the type 1 fairing was Spain’s Hispasat 30W-6. Weighing in at 6,092kg, being the size of a bus and being launched into geosynchronous transfer orbit, it’s the biggest challenge that the Falcon 9 has come up against.

50th Falcon 9 Flight 1
50th Falcon 9 flight soars into the Florida night sky, Image by @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

The First stage if the Falcon 9 fired for about 2 minutes and 35 seconds before releasing and plummeting back towards the Atlantic ocean. The initial plan was top land the “type 4” first stage on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love you” in the Atlantic. Landing legs and titanium steering grid fins were attached and went up with the rocket.  There was already speculation, due to the large payload and the orbit attempted, whether the Falcon 9 would have enough fuel left to attempt the reentry and landing procedure. Unfortunately it was not possible to find out whether the F9-51 mission would have made a landing because the autonomous drone ship was kept in port because of high sea conditions. The rocket still went through the entire reentry and landing procedure, as mentioned on the livestream, but ended up in the Atlantic.

Long exposure of Falcon 9
An awesome long exposure shot of the Falcon 9 Taking off from SLC-40. From @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

almost 9 minutes in, the second stage with the payload achieved a Low Earth Orbit, and “parked” until T+26 min 36s where they first crossed the equator. This second burn lasted 55 seconds to accelerate the ss/Loral-built satellite  into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. The Hispasat 30W-6 will fire its four SPT-100 plasma thrusters to gradually raise itself to Geosynchronous Orbit positioned 30 degrees West (clue in the name). Hispasat 30W-6 is designed to provide broadband services in Europe and Northwest Africa.

The Hispasat 30W-6 launching
The Hispasat 30W-6 launching at night, from SLC-39. From SpaceX Flickr.

Timelapse of Falcon Launch
Timelapse of Falcon Launch from across the water, from SpaceX Flickr

This is the fourth all-expendable Falcon 9 launch in the past 5 years, and the first time a “type 4” stage has been expended on it’s first flight. Both of the stages of the F9-51 rocket were tested at SpaceX Rocket Test Facility in McGregor, TX during October/November 2017. They have been at Cape Canaveral since January 2018, and were stacked ,loaded with propellant and tested (first stage only) at the Cape at SLC 40 on February 20, 2018. The Launch was initially planned for February 25th, but was shelved by SpaceX to investigate payload fairing pressurisation issues.

Raw power of Falcon 9
An image showing the raw power of the Falcon 9, from SpaceX Flickr.

The Ups And Downs Of The Falcon Heavy Launch

At 20:45 UTC on the 6th of February 2018 the long awaited Falcon Heavy soared up into the sky. Watching the livestream, there was something slightly different. Instead of the usual single commentator, they had four. Behind them, hundreds of SpaceX employees cheering all the way through the launch, with bigger cheers at each milestone. It was definitely long anticipated, and I even felt the impact at university. Students were going round making sure people knew that tonight was the night that the Falcon Heavy was launching. The stream didn’t disappoint space lovers, and I highly recommend watching it on the SpaceX Youtube page.

So what actually happened,  why was this flight so important? The demo mission was the  first firing of the full Falcon Heavy configuration. Although all the rockets had been previously fired and tested at SpaceX’s rocket test facility in McGregor, TX. Consisting of “Block 2” variant side boosters (B1023.2 and B1025.2) and a “Block 3” variant core stage (B1033.1). Both the boosters had been flown before and refurbished in Hawthorne, CA. B1023.2 was flown May 27th, 2016 for Thaicom 8 launch, landing on SpaceX’s autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You”. B1025.2 flew on July 18th, 2016 for the CRS-9 mission, landing at Landing Zone (now landing zone 1). It is noted that future Falcon Heavies will likely use the “Block 5” variant. Elon Musk Claims that the development of the Falcon Heavy project has cost $500 million to get to this stage.

Falcon Heavy Before Launch
The Falcon Heavy the night before launch. From @SpaceX on Twitter

At 20:45 UTC, the Falcon Heavy lifted off of pad 39A at Kennedy Space Centre. It weighed roughly 1,400 tonnes and was 70m tall. with 2,128 pounds of thrust, the triple barreled rocket lifted off the pad with its 27 Merlin 1D engines (9 on each booster). At the time of writing it is the largest and most powerful operational rocket in use today by a factor of 2. Elon Musk gave the launch a 50-50 chance of success, but it continued through almost all of the milestones. Through Max-Q, release of boosters, and release of the main engine. The second stage performed 3 burns during the 6 hour mission to accelerate the cargo to into a heliocentric orbit. The orbit ranges from earth orbit to beyond mars (0.99 x 1.71AU). The concept of this burn was to demonstrate long coasts between the second and third burns. This ability is needed for some DoD EELV Heavy class missions, a market that SpaceX wants to compete in.

Falcon Heavy Launching
Falcon Heavy launching from pad 39A at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base.

Intended Orbit
Intended orbit of the Falcon Heavy payload, heliocentric. From Elon Musk’s Twitter.

Usually on these types of initial flights they put some sort of simulated weight in the fairing (the bit that holds the payload on top) usually a block of concrete. Elon Musk being Elon saw this as a marketing opportunity, and instead used his personal 2008 cherry red Roadster, weighing in at 1,250kg. In the driver’s seat sat a full scale human mannequin named “Starman”, wearing a SpaceX branded pressure spacesuit. The person who timed the release of the fairing showing the Tesla against the backdrop of the earth, to the music of “Life of Mars” by David Bowie, deserves a medal. Although perfectly timed, it is sometimes incorrectly attributed as “Starman” by Bowie, which would make more sense when you think about it. On the dashboard of the car is the immortal words of “don’t panic”, a tribute to A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, that was a clever addition. There is a livestream of the first 5 hours of Starmans trip, at which time it probably lost signal, or ran out of battery. There has been mixed reviews of this stunt. Some call it art, whereas others call it “space littering”. Some commentators such as Burnie Burns on the Roosterteeth Podcast simply don’t like the use of space for marketing purposes. Scientists at Purdue University called it “the dirtiest man-made object ever to be sent to space” due to its use driving in Los Angeles.

Tesla Roadster in Orbit
Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster with Starman sat in the driver’s seat.

For me personally the most impressive part of the entire video was near to the end. SpaceX have had some famous problems with the landing of their reusable rockets, but during this mission they planned to land all three. The best shot of the entire livestream was the two boosters coming down at the same time, with the Cape in shot. Both boosters opening their landing legs, and coming down to land on Landing Zone 1 and 2. It was a truly epic sight, and from an engineers point of view, very impressive. The second pad was installed for these Falcon Heavy missions, and the boosters worked just as planned. The core was a slightly different story. It attempted to land on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You”. It completed its boost-back and reentry burn, but for the three-engine landing burn, two engines failed to ignite. The core ended up in the Atlantic. Smoothly brushed over, this was not mentioned on the Livestream, and not until a few hours later on Twitter. Even so, the things that did land correctly were impressive.

FH Side Booster Landing
The impressive shot of the side boosters landing simultaneously on LZ1 and LZ2, at Cape Canaveral.

There has been a huge amount of excitement and skepticism about the Falcon Heavy. Some have heralded it the way Elon Musk wants to get to Mars, others just love the idea that the car will be out there for “billions of years”. Although very impressive, the Falcon heavy is really designed to be a beefier version of the Falcon 9, and will probably do the same job. SpaceX are aiming in the coming years to get more contracts from the Department of Defence, and aim to get more up into space at the same time. The Falcon Heavy is all about making it cheaper for big payloads to get to space. Although it has the capability to get to Mars, and carry people, Musk has said that there are bigger plans in the pipeline for those jobs. As for the car, according to chemist William Carroll, solar and cosmic radiation will break down most of the car within a year, leaving just the aluminium frame and maybe some glass that isn’t shattered by meteorites.

The Falcon Heavy Launching
The Falcon Heavy launching, taken from behind a SpaceX hangar near the launch site.

This is a big moment for SpaceX, and the space community, and shows that there are big things coming in the sector. There are big launches aimed from the big companies this year, and new rockets being unveiled in the near future. SpaceX may have just started a new space race. For all the excessive marketing that Elon Musk does, SpaceX have definitely got their marketing message right.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com