Orbital ATK resupply the ISS

Orbital ATK launch of a Antares 230 Rocket
Orbital ATK launch a cargo resupply mission to the ISS on an Antares Rocket from Wallops. Credit: Orbital ATK Flickr.

On May 21st 2018, Orbital ATK’s Antares launch vehicle orbited the companies Cygnus OA-9 cargo hauling spacecraft. Launched from the little known NASA Wallops Island in Virginia, it took off from pad 0A at 08:44 UTC. OA-9 took 3,250 kg of cargo to the international space station, along with several cubesats that with deployer hardware added roughly 120 kg. This launch was in honour of J.R.Thompson, former Orbital Science CEO, who passed away in 2017.

Antares 230 waitjng
Antares 230 rocket waiting to launch from NASA Wallops Island. Credit: Space Launch Schedule

It was the third flight of the Antares 230 variant, a redesigned vehicle powered by two Energomash RD-181 engines instead of the AJ-26 engines that powered the first five Antares flights. The change was made after one of the AJ-26 turbopumps failed and triggered a destructive explosion above the pad in 2004. Cygnus OA-9 was the sixth enhanced Cygnus with a stretched cargo module, but only the third to fly on Antares, Atlas 5 launched the other three.#

ISS Cargo waiting
The OA-9 Cygnus cargo waiting to me mated with the rest of the rocket at Orbital ATK. Credit: Orbital ATK Flickr.

According to Orbital ATK, Cygnus  OA-9 weighed 6,173 kg at launch, matching OA-8 payload for heaviest launched by an Antares rocket. The RD-181 engines produce a total of 392 tonnes of thrust at liftoff, that powers the 293 tonne rocket into the sky. Built in Ukraine (former Soviet design), the first stage burned for 211 seconds. After first stage shutdown it seperated and coasted “up hill” for 37 seconds before the Orbital ATK Castor 30XL second stage motor ignited to produce 51 tonnes of thrust for 160 seconds. The payload fairing separated 12 seconds before second stage ignition. Cygnus separated into a 198 x 317 km x 51.63 deg orbit about 9 min 6 sec after liftoff.

OA-9 loading cargo
Orbital ATK loading cargo into the Cygnus OA-9 second stage. Credit: Orbital ATK Flickr.

Falcon 9 Re-Supplies the ISS on CRS-14

Launch of CRS-14
Threatnigh thunderstorms, an image taken by a sound triggered camera at Space Launch Complex 40. Image from @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

On April 2nd, 2018 at 20:30 UTC a Falcon 9 took off from Launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral AFB. Aboard was a refurbished Dragon capsule with CRS-14, a resupply for the ISS. This was the 14th of up to 20 CRS missions contracted with NASA, with new Crew Dragon variants soon to be used. The capsule safely reached the ISS and was docked 20 minutes earlier than planned. The cost of the mission was reported to be around $2 billion, and comes under a contract between NASA and SpaceX.

Reused Dragon Capsule on CRS-14
The CRS-14 just before launch, carrying a reused Dragon Capsule for CRS-14. Image from @marcuscotephoto on Twitter.

The Dragon capsule carried 2,630kg  of cargo to the International Space Station, including supplies and research equipment. it has 1070 kg of science equipment, 344 kg of supplies for the crew, 148 kg of vehicle hardware, 49 kg of advanced computer equipment and 99 kg of spacewalking gear. Aboard there are a number of experiments, such as a new satellite designed to test methods of removing space debris. There are also frozen sperm cell samples, a selection of polymers and other materials, all experiments to test what happens to different items when exposed to space and microgravity.

CRS-14 launch
Launch of F9-53 on April 2nd 2018, carrying CRS-14 using a reused rocket and capsule. Image from SpaceX Flickr.

Designated F9-53, the Falcon 9 used booster B1039.2, which previously boosted the CRS-12 mission in August 2017, where it returned to landing zone 1. As is customary, the first stage was left “sooty” from it’s first flight. It powered for 2 minutes and 41 seconds before falling back to earth. For the sixth time in the last 7 Falcon 9 launches, the first stage was purposefully expended, even though it carried landing legs and steering grid fins. As with other expenatures, the rocket went through the re-entry landing sequence, but just didn’t have anything to land on and ended up in the sea. It was the 11th flight of a previously flown Falcon 9 first stage, five of which have been purposefully expended during the second flight, only 3 first stages remain that can be reflown.

A Sooty Falcon 9
The Falcon 9 was left sooty after its first flight which has now become the norm. Image from @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

The second stage completed its burn at 9 minutes and 11 seconds after takeoff, to insert Dragon into a Low Earth Orbit inclined 51.6 degrees to the equator. The Dragon 10.2 is a refurbished spacecraft capsule that first flew during the CRS-8 mission in April 2016. CRS-14 was the third launch of a previously flown Dragon capsule. This was also the first time that both the Dragon capsule and the Falcon 9 were refurbished versions on the same rocket. The docking process was carried out for around 20 minutes, and at 10:40 UTC Kanai detached the lab’s robotic arm to hook the free-flying Dragon capsule. At around 12:00 UTC Houston and Canada took control of the robotic arm and maneuvered it to the Harmony capsule of the ISS. It will be unpacked in a very slow process over a number of months.

Falcon 9 CRS-14
A falcon 9 lifting off from Cape Canaveral AFB Launch Complex 40. Image from SpaceX Flickr.
CRS-14 vapour streams
You can see the vapour streams coming off the falcon 9 as it sends its cargo towards the ISS. Image from SpaceX Flickr.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com