The Foundry: Put a Lid On It

In the previous foundry post, we made the foundry hugely more efficient by adding a fan to force air into it using an old hairdryer. Although it made the fire super hot it introduced many problems. It forced the tiny pieces of ash sitting in the foundry into the air, and towards anyone in a 2m radius. Some of the fuel also gets forced out which makes it less efficient. Bad all round, especially for the neighbors clothes on the washing line, which probably smelt smoky after each burn. We came to the conclusion that we needed a lid to hold in that glorious heat.

The fire burning
The fire burning with a steel tin on top to stop the ash flying out.

We went to the internet and found the easiest way to make the lid is to just make it in the same way we made the foundry itself, but with a few modifications. Firstly we made much less, we only want a lid about an inch thick (2.5cm) for a lid. This size was thick enough to be strong, but not so thick that it was unusable. We also used a plastic bucket rather than a metal one. As plastic can be bent it allows some movement to get the set lid out of the bucket without breaking either. You also need something to make the hold in the centre, we used a bottle, but if you can find something with a nice base then use that, the bottle had its drawbacks. Make sure the item you use can be ruined, and has a slight taper, because it needs to come out when the lid is set. Once put together we left the lid for a day to set, just like with the foundry.

The new lid
The new lid sitting inside the bucket setting, with the bottle in the centre to make the hole.

As you can notice in the above image we added a way to pick up the lid. This is firstly really useful to take out of the bucket, but will also be useful when we are actually using the forge and things get hot. It is much easier if we have something to actually grab on to. We used standard off the shelf D rings from ScrewFix, but anything that has a good ring and plenty of metal for the mixture to mould around then it should work fine. For us, it made the act of picking up the lid much easier.

the first lift test
The first attempt to lift the lift after it had been taken out of the bucket.

So once it was out, we left the lid out of the mould overnight, and then tried it out the next day. For the first burn with it we were gentle, and barely put on the hairdryer. This was to make sure that we didn’t damage it, we really wanted to help the curing process. You can see the difference in the below picture though, all the heat is confined inside the forge, and no ash or particulate is coming out the top. To add or remove the lid from the top we used kitchen tongs, as the D rings get very hot. We also hd head gloves to make sure we didn’t burn ourselves in the process. Safety is paramount if doing this yourself. It is easy to make a new lid but it isn’t easy to fix third degree burns! you have been warned. That being said, from our perspective that is a working forge! Now onto melting things.

The lid setup
The full setup, with the lid on it , the first burn was much gentler to allow the lid to set better, we though an extrer first burn could damage it.

Hope you enjoyed this post, hopefully there will be another update soon, but for now search the rest of the blog, as there are some awesome images of rockets, interesting history about aerospace, and you might learn something about electronics. Thanks for reading.