The First Block 5 Launches Bangladesh’s First Satellite

F9-55 launches
An awesome image of the first Block 5 Falcon 9 taking off from LC 39A at KSC. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

On the 11th of May 2018, at 20:14 UTC the first ever block 5 Falcon 9 rocket launched Bangabandhu 1 into geosynchronous transfer orbit. Launched from Launch Complex 39A at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base, the F9-55 (launch designation) was delayed after an automatic abort on May 10th, 1 minute before liftoff. Bangabandhu 1, a Thales Alenia Space Spacebus 4000B2 series satellite is Bangladesh’s first geostationary communications satellite.

The block 5 has been long awaited by SpaceX fans, with many images in the news, and plenty of hints on Twitter. SpaceX has been incrementally improving and upgrading the Falcon 9 v1.2 booster design since it’s first launch in December 2015. Designed to be much easier to refurbish, with potentially 10 reuses in each booster. Previous block designs have only been able to be reused once before being decommissioned.

F9-55 on the pad
The F9-55 on the launchpad ready to fire a satellite into GTO more efficiently that previous versions. Credit: @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

The Block 5 incorporates higher thrust Merlin 1D engines that have turboprop modifications that were requested by NASA. These modifications are to accommodate future potential crew launches. Another big change was mentioned in the livestream, where the pressurisation method in the second stage has been improved. After the AMOS 6 Falcon 9 explosion, the new version allows for faster, later and denser, chilled kerosene fuel loading. It also has new landing legs that can be retracted without being removed like previous Falcon 9’s. There are other changes, but they have been featured in previous designs.

F9-55 launch
The Falcon 9 takes off with Bangladesh’s first geostationary communications satellite on board. Credit: @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

The first stage had designation B1046. It burned for 2 minutes and 31 seconds, before separating ro perform reentry burns. It opened its new landing legs and landed on the autonomous drone ship Of Course I Still Love You, 630km downrange in the ocean. The second stage burned for 5 minutes and 43 seconds to reach parking orbit at T+8 minutes and 19 seconds. It then restarted ar T+27 minutes and 38 seconds for a 59 second long second burn that accelerated the craft to GTO.

F9-55 awesome shot
The Falcon 9 after an aborted launch the day before, with a new paint scheme to denote the block 5. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

In the 31 attempts, 25 Falcon 9/Falcon Heavy booster have been successfully recovered. Four of the landings have been on “Just Read The Instructions” off the coast of California. 10 on land at Cape Canaveral from LZ1 with another one on  LZ2. 10 have landed on the autonomous drone ship, Of Course I Still Love You off the Florida coast. Nineteen individual first stages have been recovered, eleven have flown twice, with five of those ether expended or lost during their second flights. All the recovered stages have been v1.2 Falcon 9’s.

F9-55 power
The first look at the extra thrust on the Falcon 9 Merlin 1D engines in the new Block 5. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com

The Manned Orbiting Laboratory

NASA Special Agent Dan Oakland holds up a long-lost spacesuit uncovered at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. Credit NASA.

In early 2005, two security officers at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base in Florida were doing a check of a facility known as the Launch Complex 5/6 museum. NASA Special Agent Dann E. Oakland and Security Manager Henry Butler, of the company that oversees the museum, Delaware North Parks and Resorts, discovered a locked room. The problem was they had no key, and nobody else did! Luckily, being security officers they found a master key and gained entry. By the looks of things the room hadn’t been accessed in  many years, at least not by people, the rodents had made themselves at home. With no power the officers explored with torches and found some interesting stuff.

This is Launch Complex 5/6 blockhouse, now a museum at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida, where long-lost space suits were found. Credit: NASA.

They found retired spacesuits designed for Americans in the 1960’s that were training to be space spies. Initially they assumed the spacesuits were training suits from the end of Gemini or the beginning of Apollo space programs. When inspected by their manufacturer, the Hamilton Standard Corporation, they determined they were actually MH-7 training suits. Kept in surprisingly good condition, the suits were made for a short lived cold war-era military program to put a manned space station in orbit.

This locker reveals a long-lost spacesuit uncovered at the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) in Florida. Credit: NASA

In 1964 the Manned Orbiting Laboratory program was an Air Force initiative to send a Air Force astronauts to a space station in a Gemini capsule, as they had plenty of experience with it. While up there they would take part in surveillance and reconnaissance efforts. After spending a few weeks in orbit, the crew would simply un dock and return to Earth. A test launch from Complex 40 on Nov. 30, 1966, of a MOL was conducted with an unmanned Gemini capsule. The MOL was constructed from tankage of a Titan II rocket. The program was abandoned by the Air Force in 1969 but not before they made a great deal of technological developments. when the USAF abandoned the MOL program, they transferred all equipment and their astronaut corps to NASA.

A 1960 conceptual drawing of the Manned Orbiting Laboratory. Credit: NASA

There were two spacesuits found, one identified as 007 and another 008. The spacesuit with identifying number 008 had the name “LAWYER” on the left sleeve. The suit was traced to Lt. Col. Richard E. Lawyer, a member of the first group recruited to be MOL astronauts in 1965. Three groups of military officers trained to be MOL astronauts, when the program was cancelled seven of the younger ones were transferred to NASA’s human space flight program, and went on to have standout careers. Notable mentions are Robert Crippen, pilot of the first Space Shuttle mission, and Richard H. “Dick” Truly, who later became a NASA Administrator. All MOL astronauts who were under age 35 and survived eventually flew in NASA programs, either on board Skylab or the space shuttle.

The Exoplanet Hunter TESS Launched by Falcon 9

TESS taking off
The Falcon 9 taking off from SLC-40 at Cape Canaveral with TESS on board. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

On April 18th, 2018 at 22:51 UTC a Falcon 9 took off from Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral AFB. Aboard was NASA’s latest research satellite TESS. A mission that cost $337 million, Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS)  is the latest in a line of space based observatories that are set to launch this decade. Launched into an arching elliptical orbit that will take the spacecraft over two thirds of the distance to the moon. The first stage of the Falcon 9 landed on the autonomous drone ship Of Course I Still Love You to be refurbished and reused.

falcon 9 engines
The sheer power of the Falcon 9’s nine Merlin 1D engines produce an awesome inferno. You can clearly see the 45 written on the side as the booster designator. Credit @marcuscotephoto on Twitter.

After a 5 day checkout of the spacecraft, basically a hardware check, the ground controllers will switch on the TESS cameras. TESS is designed to scan around 85% of the sky during the two year mission, with astronomers estimating as many as 20,000 new planets could be found. It plans to build on discoveries made by NASA’s Kepler telescope which was launched in 2009 to find earth like planets. TESS carries four 16.8-megapixel cameras, and will look for dips in light coming from 200,000 preselected nearby stars. The four cameras cover a square in the sky that measures 24 x 24 degrees, wide enough to fit the Orion constellation into a single camera. the cameras together study a set area of sky for 27 days before staring at the next section.

TESS orbit
An illustration of the orbits that TESS will go through to get to the final orbit P/2. Credit: NASA.

The orbit TESS is being launched into is known as P/2, and requires time and finesse to reach. TESS will slingshot by the moon at a distance of around 5,000 miles (8,000 kilometers), using gravity to reshape its orbit, increasing the satellite’s orbital perigee, or low point, to the final planned altitude of around 67,000 miles. After the lunar flyby, the high point of the satellite’s elongated orbit will stretch well beyond the moon, and another thruster firing will nudge TESS into its final orbit in mid-June. Science data is planned to start in july, with the first year of the two year campaign aimed at the stars in the southern sky. TESS has been built to have enough fuel to last 20 or 30 years, assuming funding by NASA and the components on board continue to function correctly.

the TESS telescope
The TESS satellite before launch, the four cameras can be seen on the top of the spacecraft; Credit: NASA.

Each of TESS’s cameras have four custom built re-sensitive CCD sensors designed and developed by MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory. The sensors are claimed to be the most perfect CCD’s ever flown by a science mission. The lenses used by the cameras are only about 4 inches (10mm) wide, meaning it has a fairly low light collecting power compared to other space telescopes. The James Webb Space Telescope for example launching in 2020 had a 21.3ft (6.5m) primary mirror, although the satellite has cost over $8 billion to make. TESS is a bit like a finder telescope, it will lay a bedrock for future missions such as Webb and ground based observatories to make better readings. It gives a good idea of the best places to look, where the most likely exoplanets are.

launch of TESS
The Falcon 9 launching the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite to an orbit of P/2. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

TESS works by looking at a star, in this case mainly M-dwarf stars, which are cooler than our sun. They are also known as red dwarfs and make up most of the stars in our galaxy. When a planet goes in front of the star the light received by TESS “dips” and changes slightly in colour. This change in the light it receives can tell scientists alot about the size of a planet, and other things like density and velocity. They expect TESS to find between 500 and 1,000 planets that are between one and three times the size of Earth, and 20,000 planets the size of Neptune or Jupiter. The readings will give a good idea of where to focus on and ‘follow up’ on future missions. Then missions such as JWST can probe and use more complex tools to find information such as atmospheric composition, and whether they could be habitable.

long exposure TESS
A long exposure of the Falcon 9 taking off over the SpaceX hangar at Cape Canaveral. Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

The Falcon 9 used was a v1.2 with designation F9-54. It used a brand new “Block 4” first stage. The booster designated B1045 has a clear 45 written on the side in some of the close up booster images. The fist stage boosted for 2 minutes and 29 seconds, then detaching and slowing itself down. The booster landed downrange on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You”. The first successful drone ship landing since October 2017. A total of 24 Falcon 9 or Falcon Heavy booster stages have now been recovered in 30 attempts. Four of which were on “Just Read The Instructions” off the coast of California, ten at Cape Canaveral Landing Zone 1 and 2, and nine on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You” off the Florida Coast. 18 first stages have been recovered, 11 of which have flown twice, five have been lost during their second flight. B1045 was the last brand new “Block 4” Falcon 9 booster.

TESS taking off
An awesome photo of a Falcon 9 taking off from across the water, a perfect day for pictures! Credit: SpaceX Flickr.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com

Atlas 5 Launches a Trio of Spy Satellites

Atlas 5 taking off
Atlas 5 lifting off from pad 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base. Credit: @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

At 23.13 UTC on April 14th 2018 the third Atlas 5 launch of the year fired multiple military satellites into a near geosynchronous orbit. Launching from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral, FL,  the AV-079 (the launch designation) was an Atlas V in 551 configuration. The rocket had 5 solid rocket motors, a Centaur second stage powered by a single RL10C-1 LOX/LH2 engine, and a 5m diameter payload fairing. The entire mission lasted approximately 7 hours and is known as Air Force Space Command (AFSPC) 11 mission.

The Atlas 5 AFSPC11
The Atlas V carrying AFSPC11 for the Air Force Space Command. Credit: United Launch Alliance Flickr.
the smoke trail
A smoke trail left by the Atlas V as it launches a trio of spy satellites. Credit: @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

The mission lifted two primary satellites for the Air Force, one stacked on top of the other. On the top was CBAS (Continuous Broadcast Augmenting SATCOM) an abbreviation within an abbreviation, and a military communications satellite. The second satellite was named EAGLE (ESPA Augmented GEO Laboratory Experiment) which is an abbreviation with two abbreviations in it! This satellite is based on an Orbital ATK ESPA bus, it is a research laboratory that can host 6 deployable payloads. It is said that EAGLE likely weighed around 780 kg. There was also a subsatellite named “Mycroft” reported to be on the flight, but not confirmed.

The fury of the Atlas V
The fury of the 5 solid rocket boosters found on this Atlas V. Credit: United Launch Alliance Flickr.

The Solid motors finished their burn and seperated 1 minute and 47 seconds after liftoff. The first stage,  an RD-180 rocket fired for 4 minutes and 33.5 seconds. Centaur then performed 3 burns which were not shown on the livestream. The first burn was meant to last 6 minutes 1 seconds to reach a low earth parking orbit. The second burn began 12 minutes and 6 seconds after the first cutoff, and last 4 minutes and 49 seconds, putting the vehicle into a geosynchronous transfer orbit. After a 5 hour and 6 minute apogee, a third burn of 2 minutes and 36 seconds completed the insertion to the planned orbit. A spacecraft separation extended for another 1 and a half hours to T+6 hours 57 min 24 sec.

Atlas v launchpad
Atlas V rolling to the launchpad at Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral AFB. Credit: United Launch Alliance Flickr.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com

Falcon 9 Re-Supplies the ISS on CRS-14

Launch of CRS-14
Threatnigh thunderstorms, an image taken by a sound triggered camera at Space Launch Complex 40. Image from @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

On April 2nd, 2018 at 20:30 UTC a Falcon 9 took off from Launch complex 40 at Cape Canaveral AFB. Aboard was a refurbished Dragon capsule with CRS-14, a resupply for the ISS. This was the 14th of up to 20 CRS missions contracted with NASA, with new Crew Dragon variants soon to be used. The capsule safely reached the ISS and was docked 20 minutes earlier than planned. The cost of the mission was reported to be around $2 billion, and comes under a contract between NASA and SpaceX.

Reused Dragon Capsule on CRS-14
The CRS-14 just before launch, carrying a reused Dragon Capsule for CRS-14. Image from @marcuscotephoto on Twitter.

The Dragon capsule carried 2,630kg  of cargo to the International Space Station, including supplies and research equipment. it has 1070 kg of science equipment, 344 kg of supplies for the crew, 148 kg of vehicle hardware, 49 kg of advanced computer equipment and 99 kg of spacewalking gear. Aboard there are a number of experiments, such as a new satellite designed to test methods of removing space debris. There are also frozen sperm cell samples, a selection of polymers and other materials, all experiments to test what happens to different items when exposed to space and microgravity.

CRS-14 launch
Launch of F9-53 on April 2nd 2018, carrying CRS-14 using a reused rocket and capsule. Image from SpaceX Flickr.

Designated F9-53, the Falcon 9 used booster B1039.2, which previously boosted the CRS-12 mission in August 2017, where it returned to landing zone 1. As is customary, the first stage was left “sooty” from it’s first flight. It powered for 2 minutes and 41 seconds before falling back to earth. For the sixth time in the last 7 Falcon 9 launches, the first stage was purposefully expended, even though it carried landing legs and steering grid fins. As with other expenatures, the rocket went through the re-entry landing sequence, but just didn’t have anything to land on and ended up in the sea. It was the 11th flight of a previously flown Falcon 9 first stage, five of which have been purposefully expended during the second flight, only 3 first stages remain that can be reflown.

A Sooty Falcon 9
The Falcon 9 was left sooty after its first flight which has now become the norm. Image from @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

The second stage completed its burn at 9 minutes and 11 seconds after takeoff, to insert Dragon into a Low Earth Orbit inclined 51.6 degrees to the equator. The Dragon 10.2 is a refurbished spacecraft capsule that first flew during the CRS-8 mission in April 2016. CRS-14 was the third launch of a previously flown Dragon capsule. This was also the first time that both the Dragon capsule and the Falcon 9 were refurbished versions on the same rocket. The docking process was carried out for around 20 minutes, and at 10:40 UTC Kanai detached the lab’s robotic arm to hook the free-flying Dragon capsule. At around 12:00 UTC Houston and Canada took control of the robotic arm and maneuvered it to the Harmony capsule of the ISS. It will be unpacked in a very slow process over a number of months.

Falcon 9 CRS-14
A falcon 9 lifting off from Cape Canaveral AFB Launch Complex 40. Image from SpaceX Flickr.
CRS-14 vapour streams
You can see the vapour streams coming off the falcon 9 as it sends its cargo towards the ISS. Image from SpaceX Flickr.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com

Explorer 1 and the Van Allen Story

On February 1st, 1958 at 03:48 UTC (January 31st at 22:48 EST), the first Juno booster launched Explorer 1 into Low Earth Orbit. It was the first satellite to be successfully launched by the United States, and the third ever, after Sputnik 1 and 2 in 1957. Launched from the Army Ballistic Missile Agency’s (ABMA) Cape Canaveral Missile Annex in Florida, now known as Launch Complex 26. The launch played a pivotal part in the discovery of the Van Allen Belt, Explorer 1 was the start of the Explorer series, a set of over 80 scientific satellites. Although sometimes looked over in the history of space, it guided the US space program to what it eventually became.

William Hayward Pickering, James Van Allen, and Wernher von Braun display a full-scale model of Explorer 1 at a crowded news conference in Washington, DC after confirmation the satellite was in orbit.

In 1954 The US Navy and US Army had a joint project known as Project Orbiter, aiming to get a satellite into orbit during 1957. It was going to be launched on a Redstone missile, but the Eisenhower administration rejected the idea in 1955 in favour of the Navy’s project Vanguard. Vanguard was an attempt to use a more civilian styled booster, rather than repurposed missiles. It failed fairly spectacularly in 1957 when the Vanguard TV3 exploded on the launchpad on live TV, less than a month after the launch of Sputnik 2. This deepened American public dismay at the space race. This lead to the army getting a shot at being the first american object in space.

The launch
Launch of Jupiter-C/Explorer 1 at Cape Canaveral, Florida on January 31, 1958.

In somewhat of a mad dash to get Explorer 1 ready, the Army Ballistic Missile Agency had been creating reentry vehicles for ballistic missiles, but kept up hope of getting something into orbit. At the same time Physicist James Van Allen of Iowa State University, was making the primary scientific instrument payload for the mission. As well this, JPL director William H. Pickering was providing the satellite itself. Along with Wernher Von Braun, who had the skills to create the launch system. After the Vanguard failure, the JPL-ABMA group was given permission to use a Jupiter-C reentry test vehicle (renamed Juno) and adapt it to launch the satellite. The Jupiter IRBM reentry nose cone had already been flight tested, speeding up the process. It took the team a total of 84 days to modify the rocket and build Explorer 1.

Preparing the explorer 1
Explorer 1 is mated to its booster at LC-26

The satellite itself, designed and built by graduate students at California Institute of Technology’s JPL under the direction of William H. Pickering was the second satellite to carry a mission payload (Sputnik 2 being the first). Shaped much like a rocket itself, it only weighed 13.37kg (30.8lb) of which 8.3kg (18.3lb) was the instrumentation. The instrumentation sat at the front of the satellite, with the rear being a small rocket motor acting as the fourth stage, this section didn’t detach. The data was transmitted to the ground by two antennas of differing types. A 60 milliwatt transmitter fed dipole antenna with two fiberglass slot antennas in the body of the satellite, operating at 108.3MHz, and four flexible whips acting as a turnstile antenna, fed by a 10 milliwatt transmitter operating at 108.00MHz.

Explorer 1 parts
A diagram showing some of the main parts of the Explorer 1 satellite

As there was a limited timeframe, with limited space available, and a requirement for low weight, the instrumentation was designed to be simple, and highly reliable. An Iowa Cosmic Ray instrument was used. It used germanium and silicon transistors in the electronics. 29 transistors were used in the Explorer 1 payload instrumentation, with others being used in the Army’s micrometeorite amplifier.  The power was provided by mercury chemical batteries, what weighed roughly 40% of the total payload weight. The outside of the instrumentation section was sandblasted stainless steel  with white and black stripes. There were many potential colour schemes, which is why there are articles models and photographs showing different configurations. The final scheme was decided by studies of shadow-sunlight intervals based on firing time, trajectory, orbit and inclination. The stripes are often also seen on many of the early Wernher Von Braun Rockets.

NASM flight spare
The flight ready spare of the Explorer 1, now shown at the National Air and Space Museum.

The instrument was meant to have a tape recorder on board, but was not modeled in time to be put onto the spacecraft. This meant that all the data received was real-time and from the on board antennas. Plus as there were no downrange tracking stations, they could only pick up signals while the satellite was over them. This meant that they could not get a recording from the entire earth. It also meant that when the rocket went up, and dipped over the horizon, they had no idea whether it got into orbit. Half an hour after the launch Albert Hibbs, Explorers System designer from JPL, who was responsible for orbit calculations walked into the room and declared there was a 95% chance the satellite was in orbit. In response, the Major snapped: “Don’t give me any of this probability crap, Hibbs. Is the thing up there or not?”.

Explorer 1 Mission Badge
The official JPL mission pac=tch for the Explorer 1 mission.

The instrument was the baby of one of Van Allens graduate students, George Ludwig. When he heard the payload was going into the Explorer 1 (and not the Vanguard) he packed up his family and set off for JPL to work with the engineers there. He has a good oral history section on this link, talking about designing some of the first electronics in space. He was there watching the rocket launch and waiting for results. From the Navy’s Vanguard Microlock receiving station they watched the telemetry that reported the health of the cosmic-ray package. The first 300 seconds were very hopeful, with a quick rise in counting rates followed by a drop to a constant 10-20  counts per second, as expected. The calculations told them when they should hear from the satellite again, but 12 minutes after the expected time, nothing showed up but eventually, after pure silence, Explorer 1 finally reported home.

The Van Allen Belt
This diagram showcases the Van Allen belts, which were first detected by instruments aboard Explorer 1 and Explorer 3. The Van Allen belts were the first major scientific discovery of the space age.

Once in orbit, Explorer 1 transmitted data for 105 days. The satellite was reported to be successful in its first month of operation. From the scientist point of view, the lack of data meant the results were difficult to conclude. The data was also different to the expectations, it was recording less meteoric dust than expected and varying amounts of cosmic radiation, and sometimes silent above 600 miles. This was figured out on Explorer 3 when they realised the counters were being saturated by too much radiation. Leading to the discovery of the Van Allen Radiation Belt. Although they described the belt as “death lurking 70 miles up” it actually deflects high energy particles away from earth, meaning life can be sustained on earth. The satellite batteries powered the high-powered transmitter for 31 days, and after 105 days it sent it’s last transmission on May 23rd 1958. It still remained in orbit for 12 years, reentering the atmosphere over the pacific ocean on March 31st after 58,000 orbits.

The 50th Flight of the Falcon 9

Awe inspiring Falcon 9 Photo
A truly awe inspiring photo Of the Falcon 9’s 50th flight. From the SpaceX Flickr.

At 05:33 UTC on March 6th 2018 SpaceX launched it’s 50th Falcon 9 mission. The version 1.2 Falcon 9, with a brand new “Block 4” variant booster B1044, lifted off from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40. On board, inside the type 1 fairing was Spain’s Hispasat 30W-6. Weighing in at 6,092kg, being the size of a bus and being launched into geosynchronous transfer orbit, it’s the biggest challenge that the Falcon 9 has come up against.

50th Falcon 9 Flight 1
50th Falcon 9 flight soars into the Florida night sky, Image by @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

The First stage if the Falcon 9 fired for about 2 minutes and 35 seconds before releasing and plummeting back towards the Atlantic ocean. The initial plan was top land the “type 4” first stage on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love you” in the Atlantic. Landing legs and titanium steering grid fins were attached and went up with the rocket.  There was already speculation, due to the large payload and the orbit attempted, whether the Falcon 9 would have enough fuel left to attempt the reentry and landing procedure. Unfortunately it was not possible to find out whether the F9-51 mission would have made a landing because the autonomous drone ship was kept in port because of high sea conditions. The rocket still went through the entire reentry and landing procedure, as mentioned on the livestream, but ended up in the Atlantic.

Long exposure of Falcon 9
An awesome long exposure shot of the Falcon 9 Taking off from SLC-40. From @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

almost 9 minutes in, the second stage with the payload achieved a Low Earth Orbit, and “parked” until T+26 min 36s where they first crossed the equator. This second burn lasted 55 seconds to accelerate the ss/Loral-built satellite  into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. The Hispasat 30W-6 will fire its four SPT-100 plasma thrusters to gradually raise itself to Geosynchronous Orbit positioned 30 degrees West (clue in the name). Hispasat 30W-6 is designed to provide broadband services in Europe and Northwest Africa.

The Hispasat 30W-6 launching
The Hispasat 30W-6 launching at night, from SLC-39. From SpaceX Flickr.
Timelapse of Falcon Launch
Timelapse of Falcon Launch from across the water, from SpaceX Flickr

This is the fourth all-expendable Falcon 9 launch in the past 5 years, and the first time a “type 4” stage has been expended on it’s first flight. Both of the stages of the F9-51 rocket were tested at SpaceX Rocket Test Facility in McGregor, TX during October/November 2017. They have been at Cape Canaveral since January 2018, and were stacked ,loaded with propellant and tested (first stage only) at the Cape at SLC 40 on February 20, 2018. The Launch was initially planned for February 25th, but was shelved by SpaceX to investigate payload fairing pressurisation issues.

Raw power of Falcon 9
An image showing the raw power of the Falcon 9, from SpaceX Flickr.

The Latest Atlas V Launch GOES-S Well

The Atlas V launch
The Atlas V launch taken by @marcuscotephoto on twitter.

At 22:02 UTC on March 1st 2018 the Second Atlas V launch of 2018 fired the 5,192kg GOES-S satellite into orbit. Launching from Space Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral, FL, the AV-077 (the launch designation) was an Atlas V in 541  configuration. GOES-S, an A2100 series satellite built by Lockheed Martin, was separated 3.5 hours into the mission into a 8,215km x 35,286km x 9.52 deg Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit (GTO).

Atlas V launch
Atlas V launch from Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral, FL. Image from @NOAASatellites Twitter.

The second of a new generation of weather satellites for the United States, GOES-S follows in the footsteps of GOES-East, now renamed to GOES-16. A huge jump in satellite capability, the new set of satellites cover from eastern Japan all the way over to west Africa, as well as parts of the Arctic and Antarctic. They can detect storms faster, see lightning and even have sensors to detect solar storms. The satellites were commissioned by the National Environmental Satellite, Data and Information Service (NESDIS) who manage the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) constellation of environmental satellites. For more images and information follow them on twitter @NOAASatellites.

The new generation of weather satellites
Image showing the difference between GOES-16 and the previous version, GOES-13. Image from @NOASatellites twitter.

There are versions of the livestream on Youtube, and a highlight reel on the ULA Youtube page. They are definitely worth a watch if you want more information from the engineers themselves.

Atlas V launch
Atlas V launching the GOES-S satellite on March 1st 2018. Image from @NOAASatellites Twitter
The Atlas V just taking off
The Atlas V just taking off, Image from @NOAASatellites

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com

The Ups And Downs Of The Falcon Heavy Launch

At 20:45 UTC on the 6th of February 2018 the long awaited Falcon Heavy soared up into the sky. Watching the livestream, there was something slightly different. Instead of the usual single commentator, they had four. Behind them, hundreds of SpaceX employees cheering all the way through the launch, with bigger cheers at each milestone. It was definitely long anticipated, and I even felt the impact at university. Students were going round making sure people knew that tonight was the night that the Falcon Heavy was launching. The stream didn’t disappoint space lovers, and I highly recommend watching it on the SpaceX Youtube page.

So what actually happened,  why was this flight so important? The demo mission was the  first firing of the full Falcon Heavy configuration. Although all the rockets had been previously fired and tested at SpaceX’s rocket test facility in McGregor, TX. Consisting of “Block 2” variant side boosters (B1023.2 and B1025.2) and a “Block 3” variant core stage (B1033.1). Both the boosters had been flown before and refurbished in Hawthorne, CA. B1023.2 was flown May 27th, 2016 for Thaicom 8 launch, landing on SpaceX’s autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You”. B1025.2 flew on July 18th, 2016 for the CRS-9 mission, landing at Landing Zone (now landing zone 1). It is noted that future Falcon Heavies will likely use the “Block 5” variant. Elon Musk Claims that the development of the Falcon Heavy project has cost $500 million to get to this stage.

Falcon Heavy Before Launch
The Falcon Heavy the night before launch. From @SpaceX on Twitter

At 20:45 UTC, the Falcon Heavy lifted off of pad 39A at Kennedy Space Centre. It weighed roughly 1,400 tonnes and was 70m tall. with 2,128 pounds of thrust, the triple barreled rocket lifted off the pad with its 27 Merlin 1D engines (9 on each booster). At the time of writing it is the largest and most powerful operational rocket in use today by a factor of 2. Elon Musk gave the launch a 50-50 chance of success, but it continued through almost all of the milestones. Through Max-Q, release of boosters, and release of the main engine. The second stage performed 3 burns during the 6 hour mission to accelerate the cargo to into a heliocentric orbit. The orbit ranges from earth orbit to beyond mars (0.99 x 1.71AU). The concept of this burn was to demonstrate long coasts between the second and third burns. This ability is needed for some DoD EELV Heavy class missions, a market that SpaceX wants to compete in.

Falcon Heavy Launching
Falcon Heavy launching from pad 39A at Cape Canaveral Air Force Base.
Intended Orbit
Intended orbit of the Falcon Heavy payload, heliocentric. From Elon Musk’s Twitter.

Usually on these types of initial flights they put some sort of simulated weight in the fairing (the bit that holds the payload on top) usually a block of concrete. Elon Musk being Elon saw this as a marketing opportunity, and instead used his personal 2008 cherry red Roadster, weighing in at 1,250kg. In the driver’s seat sat a full scale human mannequin named “Starman”, wearing a SpaceX branded pressure spacesuit. The person who timed the release of the fairing showing the Tesla against the backdrop of the earth, to the music of “Life of Mars” by David Bowie, deserves a medal. Although perfectly timed, it is sometimes incorrectly attributed as “Starman” by Bowie, which would make more sense when you think about it. On the dashboard of the car is the immortal words of “don’t panic”, a tribute to A Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy, that was a clever addition. There is a livestream of the first 5 hours of Starmans trip, at which time it probably lost signal, or ran out of battery. There has been mixed reviews of this stunt. Some call it art, whereas others call it “space littering”. Some commentators such as Burnie Burns on the Roosterteeth Podcast simply don’t like the use of space for marketing purposes. Scientists at Purdue University called it “the dirtiest man-made object ever to be sent to space” due to its use driving in Los Angeles.

Tesla Roadster in Orbit
Elon Musk’s Tesla Roadster with Starman sat in the driver’s seat.

For me personally the most impressive part of the entire video was near to the end. SpaceX have had some famous problems with the landing of their reusable rockets, but during this mission they planned to land all three. The best shot of the entire livestream was the two boosters coming down at the same time, with the Cape in shot. Both boosters opening their landing legs, and coming down to land on Landing Zone 1 and 2. It was a truly epic sight, and from an engineers point of view, very impressive. The second pad was installed for these Falcon Heavy missions, and the boosters worked just as planned. The core was a slightly different story. It attempted to land on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love You”. It completed its boost-back and reentry burn, but for the three-engine landing burn, two engines failed to ignite. The core ended up in the Atlantic. Smoothly brushed over, this was not mentioned on the Livestream, and not until a few hours later on Twitter. Even so, the things that did land correctly were impressive.

FH Side Booster Landing
The impressive shot of the side boosters landing simultaneously on LZ1 and LZ2, at Cape Canaveral.

There has been a huge amount of excitement and skepticism about the Falcon Heavy. Some have heralded it the way Elon Musk wants to get to Mars, others just love the idea that the car will be out there for “billions of years”. Although very impressive, the Falcon heavy is really designed to be a beefier version of the Falcon 9, and will probably do the same job. SpaceX are aiming in the coming years to get more contracts from the Department of Defence, and aim to get more up into space at the same time. The Falcon Heavy is all about making it cheaper for big payloads to get to space. Although it has the capability to get to Mars, and carry people, Musk has said that there are bigger plans in the pipeline for those jobs. As for the car, according to chemist William Carroll, solar and cosmic radiation will break down most of the car within a year, leaving just the aluminium frame and maybe some glass that isn’t shattered by meteorites.

The Falcon Heavy Launching
The Falcon Heavy launching, taken from behind a SpaceX hangar near the launch site.

This is a big moment for SpaceX, and the space community, and shows that there are big things coming in the sector. There are big launches aimed from the big companies this year, and new rockets being unveiled in the near future. SpaceX may have just started a new space race. For all the excessive marketing that Elon Musk does, SpaceX have definitely got their marketing message right.

To find similar photos, and to buy reasonably priced prints of some of the above visit www.marcuscotephotography.com