Roundup: Parker Solar Probe Launch

Rocket flames
An awesome image of the Delta IV heavy launching from pad 37B. Credit: Aerojet Rocketdyne.

At 07:31 UTC on August the 12th 2018 the 10th ever Delta IV heavy vehicle launched the long awaited Parker Solar Probe from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 37B. The Delta 4 Heavy launched PSP towards a heliocentric orbit. The mission aims to “touch the sun”, and to get as close to the sun as man has ever been. Getting as close as 3.9 million miles from the sun, that’s roughly 4% of the distance between the Earth and the Sun (roughly 93 million miles).

time lapse
A great timelapse of the Delta 4 heavy launching towards the sun. Credit: Marcus Cote.

The Parker Solar Probe was named after Dr Eugene Parker who discovered the solar winds in 1958. He was present at the launch at the Kennedy Space Centre, seeing the 685kg spacecraft lifted. The 7 year mission will make 24 elliptical orbits of the sun, and uses 7 flybys of Venus to drop the low point of the orbit. It will make the closest point of the orbit closer than any other man made object in heliocentric orbit. It will enter the sun’s “atmosphere”, a section known as the corona, the outermost part of the atmosphere. Protected by a 4.5 inch sunshield, it can withstand temperatures of 2500F (1377C). The aim is to understand how the sun can creates and evolves solar flares and solar winds. It is to understand how the highest energy particles that pass the Earth are formed. It is hoped that it will revolutionise our understanding of the sun, to help us develop and create technology here on Earth.

The rocket has three RS-68A boosters, with the outbound boosters cutting off at T+3 min 57 sec, the core then cut off a minute and a half later at T+5 min 36 sec. The Delta’s cryogenic first stage engine was RL10B-2, which began burning at T+5 min 55 sec, and stopped its first burn at T+10 min 37 sec. This burn entered the 3,044 kg load into a 168 km x 183 km x 28.38 deg parking orbit. The second burn started at T+22 min 25 sec, and ended at T+36 min 39 sec, accelerating it to C3 of 59 km2/sec2, roughly 5,300 m/s out of LEO. At this point the Probe was in solar orbit, the Star 4BV separated at T+37 min 9 sec, with it firing at T+37 min 29 sec. The burn ended a minute and a half later at T+38 min 58 sec, accelerating it to 8,750 m/s beyond LEO. The Parker Solar Probe separated four and a half minutes later. The orbits after this point become much more complicated to get to the prefered orbit touching the sun.

Engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, work on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft. Parker Solar Probe will be the first-ever mission to fly directly through the Sun’s atmosphere. Photo & Caption Credit: NASA / JHU-APL

The Delta 380 was the first Cape Canaveral Delta to use the upgraded “common avionics” system for its flight controller. The rocket was shipped to the Cape over a year ago, with it being assembled in the SLC 37 HIF. The rocket was then rolled out to the pad in April 2018, and there was a wet dress rehearsal on June 2 and 6th. The initial date for launch was the day before, august 11th but it was scrubbed at T-1 min 55 sec. Some of the best images of these launches are now taken by amateurs. I usually post a few of the images, but this launch was different as most of those who placed their cameras just a few hundred feet from the rocket got very damaged equipment.

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.

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