The 50th Flight of the Falcon 9

Awe inspiring Falcon 9 Photo
A truly awe inspiring photo Of the Falcon 9’s 50th flight. From the SpaceX Flickr.

At 05:33 UTC on March 6th 2018 SpaceX launched it’s 50th Falcon 9 mission. The version 1.2 Falcon 9, with a brand new “Block 4” variant booster B1044, lifted off from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 40. On board, inside the type 1 fairing was Spain’s Hispasat 30W-6. Weighing in at 6,092kg, being the size of a bus and being launched into geosynchronous transfer orbit, it’s the biggest challenge that the Falcon 9 has come up against.

50th Falcon 9 Flight 1
50th Falcon 9 flight soars into the Florida night sky, Image by @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

The First stage if the Falcon 9 fired for about 2 minutes and 35 seconds before releasing and plummeting back towards the Atlantic ocean. The initial plan was top land the “type 4” first stage on the autonomous drone ship “Of Course I Still Love you” in the Atlantic. Landing legs and titanium steering grid fins were attached and went up with the rocket.  There was already speculation, due to the large payload and the orbit attempted, whether the Falcon 9 would have enough fuel left to attempt the reentry and landing procedure. Unfortunately it was not possible to find out whether the F9-51 mission would have made a landing because the autonomous drone ship was kept in port because of high sea conditions. The rocket still went through the entire reentry and landing procedure, as mentioned on the livestream, but ended up in the Atlantic.

Long exposure of Falcon 9
An awesome long exposure shot of the Falcon 9 Taking off from SLC-40. From @marcuscotephoto on Twitter

almost 9 minutes in, the second stage with the payload achieved a Low Earth Orbit, and “parked” until T+26 min 36s where they first crossed the equator. This second burn lasted 55 seconds to accelerate the ss/Loral-built satellite  into a Geosynchronous Transfer Orbit. The Hispasat 30W-6 will fire its four SPT-100 plasma thrusters to gradually raise itself to Geosynchronous Orbit positioned 30 degrees West (clue in the name). Hispasat 30W-6 is designed to provide broadband services in Europe and Northwest Africa.

The Hispasat 30W-6 launching
The Hispasat 30W-6 launching at night, from SLC-39. From SpaceX Flickr.
Timelapse of Falcon Launch
Timelapse of Falcon Launch from across the water, from SpaceX Flickr

This is the fourth all-expendable Falcon 9 launch in the past 5 years, and the first time a “type 4” stage has been expended on it’s first flight. Both of the stages of the F9-51 rocket were tested at SpaceX Rocket Test Facility in McGregor, TX during October/November 2017. They have been at Cape Canaveral since January 2018, and were stacked ,loaded with propellant and tested (first stage only) at the Cape at SLC 40 on February 20, 2018. The Launch was initially planned for February 25th, but was shelved by SpaceX to investigate payload fairing pressurisation issues.

Raw power of Falcon 9
An image showing the raw power of the Falcon 9, from SpaceX Flickr.

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