Getting Ugly, Dead Bugs, and Manhattan Style

If you are anything like me, you love to build small circuits. I like to try and get my head around how things work by making it in front of me. This is usually in the form of breadboarding, but sometimes that doesn’t cut it, and soldering is needed. Veroboard tends to be my go to for building a simple circuit as something a bit more permanent, but it doesn’t always lend itself to certain designs. Take a design with lots of grounding points in the design, like an RF circuit, it can be difficult to have lots of ground strips everywhere, and the extra capacitance can mess with those high frequency signals. Also, designs with lots of different separate signal traces going round the board can make for a real pain. lots of slicing the traces, which tend to lead to mistakes. With my constant desire for order and straight lines, and pretty layouts this can get annoying quickly. Recently I have found a few new and simpler ways to throw together simple circuitry. For any budding electronic engineer, they are good skills to add to an arsenal.

A veroboard design of a hybrid microphone amplifier and level shifter I made for a recent project, prototyped on veroboard, many mistakes were made.

Ugly Circuits

As the name suggests, ugly circuits are not always the prettiest of designs. There are a few different definitions of what makes an ugly circuit, but my favourite is any circuit where the components are not completely mechanically connected to the substrate. The substrate usually being a copper clad board, but not always. This method can be a tricky one to master, as it is literally a balancing act. The prefered method that I see this being used is having a single copper clad board as a giant unobstructed ground plane. Two wire passives are usually the easiest to start with (standard resistors/capacitors), soldering one side to ground, then soldering the other side to another component in the air. This means any point that is not grounded is usually floating physically in the air (but depending on how good you are it could have floating voltage too). This can be a big benefit to RF circuitry or circuits that need good solid grounding. The unobstructed copper clad board means anything connected to it has a great connection to ground. It is fairly easy to build simple passive filters, but gets very fiddly and fragile if you aren’t careful.

A very “haywire” circuit constructed in the ugly style by Rick Anderson – KE3IJ in 2006. An experimental stage of his AGC-80 Regan receiver.
Not sure on the origin of this one, but it is more chaotic rather than ugly. It is definitely in the ugly style.

Technically ugly circuits don’t have to have a substrate at all, although it makes life easier. There are plenty of examples out there of ugly circuitry that just connects pins to pins via small wires. As said before, it can be very fiddly to make a circuit like this, but it is much cheaper to make singles as there is no need for expensive copper clad board. Plus after plenty of practice one can get very good at doing it. The wires connecting the parts together can be part of the structure of the unit, and if designed correctly could be very strong. The construction method can be useful in certain circumstances, and as long as you have the components, it can be build easily with just a soldering iron and solder. Although there are some amazing looking circuits made from this method, the majority do earn the name of an ugly circuit. If you can make a pretty one I would love to see.

Nathanxl at the Electro music forums creates some amazing almost artistic music project using the ugly style, but they look incredibly hard to make.
An Arduino Uno made without any substrate, just wires and components. Made by Kimo Kosaka, it is not an ugly, but it uses an ugly style of construction.

Dead Bugs

No, this method does not actually use dead insects as a manufacturing material, but it may look like it. The idea is to take an IC, traditionally in a DIP package, and place it upside down on the substrate. Usually glueing, but not always, with the pins facing upwards, so it has the look of a dead bug. The pins can be bent to attach to the substrate if required, but they tend to be facing up. Taking many methods from ugly, the pins are usually directly connected to passives or wires to other chips. This means the mechanical connections are usually in the air. The benefit to this method is that you don’t have to waste time drilling holes in in the substrate, and can integrate IC’s into an ugly design fairly easily. If trying to use this method, just be weary that all the pins on the chip will be the wrong way round as it gets flipped when placed upside down. I recommend making your own diagram to go from to make life easier.

As you can see in this use of dead bug mixed with ugly construction made by JCHaywire is the chip flipped over and the pins moved about with all the connections floating in the air

Although not really dead bugs, the concept can be seen in many modifications of PCB’s. It is easy to order the wrong package or get sections of pins wrong when designing and ordering PCB’s, especially if you have manually made the part. So it is not uncommon to find upside down IC’s on prototype PCBs or even sometimes on short runs. That being said, anything smaller than a DIP or SOIC package can get very fiddly, and is difficult to hand solder, and will need some extra magnification. Don’t be deterred though, there are many examples of even QFN and even BGA devices being hand soldered in the dead bug form, with very thin gauge jumper wires. With plenty of practice and spares, it can be a useful method of saving money without having a new run of PCB’s.

A bodge on a PCB before the real chip arrives, a 6650 is being used in dead bug style to get the circuit working by Dave Curran.

Manhattan Style

This one is my favourite styles of circuit design on the cheap and quick, and if done right can be very pretty and efficient. The big issue with the ugly method is that it is difficult to create, and often difficult to follow, and horrible to document. Manhattan is an upgrade, using cut out sections of copper board as small islands, much like manhattan. This method means there are no connections floating in the air, as all points on a component are mechanically connected to copper clad in some way, even if it is only a small bit. This leads to generally a much nicer laid out board, that can easily be followed and replicated. It also allows for use of SMD components, which is possible with ugly, but very difficult. The small pads don’t have to be separate, they can simply be cut outlines on the same backplane, making the process cheaper, but get it wrong and it can get messy. I much prefer manhattan as a quick construction method, due to its neat look and ease of use. Another reason for the name Manhattan is the fact the capacitors and resistors tend to line up and are perpendicular to the substrate, looking a bit like tower blocks and skyscrapers like Manhattan itself.

A great example of Manhattan style soldering by Dave Richards. Solid copper substrate with QRPme pads to attach components together. 
Another impressive circuit in the Manhattan style by Dave Richards, this one is a high performance regen receiver, with a full write up on his blog.
An example by VE7SL – Steve of making his own pads for his amateur radio transmitters and receivers, using an Ebay punch to make the pads.

One step on from Manhattan style, and the final step before fully fledged PCB’s is a little known style called Pittsburg, much like the steak. I have also seen it be called muppet style, and I am sure there are many other names for it. It is very similar to an actual PCB, usually etched, a layout is carved into the board, with traces and pads. The difference from a PCB is the fact there are no holes anywhere to be seen. Meaning you get the benefit of being able to etch a nice looking layout at home, and the benefit of not needing expensive routers/drills that quickly break. To allow for the pads to be soldered to as the main mechanical connection they are much bigger to allow for more solder on a bigger surface area. These pads would be overkill for a thru hole project, but also allows for easy use of SMD components. You can sometimes see specialist pads like Pittsburg to use SMD chips on a Manhattan style board. It is a matter of taste and confidence. These methods are obviously not suitable for all prototypes, but could come in useful for your next project. 

A Pittsburgh style PCB at one point sold by Joe Porter, unsure if they are still sold.

A good source of the small pads used in Manhattan can be found here. Reasonable price, and if you are doing lots of prototyping you can even buy the tools to make it yourself!

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.


Roundup: Parker Solar Probe Launch

Rocket flames
An awesome image of the Delta IV heavy launching from pad 37B. Credit: Aerojet Rocketdyne.

At 07:31 UTC on August the 12th 2018 the 10th ever Delta IV heavy vehicle launched the long awaited Parker Solar Probe from Cape Canaveral Space Launch Complex 37B. The Delta 4 Heavy launched PSP towards a heliocentric orbit. The mission aims to “touch the sun”, and to get as close to the sun as man has ever been. Getting as close as 3.9 million miles from the sun, that’s roughly 4% of the distance between the Earth and the Sun (roughly 93 million miles).

time lapse
A great timelapse of the Delta 4 heavy launching towards the sun. Credit: Marcus Cote.

The Parker Solar Probe was named after Dr Eugene Parker who discovered the solar winds in 1958. He was present at the launch at the Kennedy Space Centre, seeing the 685kg spacecraft lifted. The 7 year mission will make 24 elliptical orbits of the sun, and uses 7 flybys of Venus to drop the low point of the orbit. It will make the closest point of the orbit closer than any other man made object in heliocentric orbit. It will enter the sun’s “atmosphere”, a section known as the corona, the outermost part of the atmosphere. Protected by a 4.5 inch sunshield, it can withstand temperatures of 2500F (1377C). The aim is to understand how the sun can creates and evolves solar flares and solar winds. It is to understand how the highest energy particles that pass the Earth are formed. It is hoped that it will revolutionise our understanding of the sun, to help us develop and create technology here on Earth.

The rocket has three RS-68A boosters, with the outbound boosters cutting off at T+3 min 57 sec, the core then cut off a minute and a half later at T+5 min 36 sec. The Delta’s cryogenic first stage engine was RL10B-2, which began burning at T+5 min 55 sec, and stopped its first burn at T+10 min 37 sec. This burn entered the 3,044 kg load into a 168 km x 183 km x 28.38 deg parking orbit. The second burn started at T+22 min 25 sec, and ended at T+36 min 39 sec, accelerating it to C3 of 59 km2/sec2, roughly 5,300 m/s out of LEO. At this point the Probe was in solar orbit, the Star 4BV separated at T+37 min 9 sec, with it firing at T+37 min 29 sec. The burn ended a minute and a half later at T+38 min 58 sec, accelerating it to 8,750 m/s beyond LEO. The Parker Solar Probe separated four and a half minutes later. The orbits after this point become much more complicated to get to the prefered orbit touching the sun.

Engineers at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Maryland, work on NASA’s Parker Solar Probe spacecraft. Parker Solar Probe will be the first-ever mission to fly directly through the Sun’s atmosphere. Photo & Caption Credit: NASA / JHU-APL

The Delta 380 was the first Cape Canaveral Delta to use the upgraded “common avionics” system for its flight controller. The rocket was shipped to the Cape over a year ago, with it being assembled in the SLC 37 HIF. The rocket was then rolled out to the pad in April 2018, and there was a wet dress rehearsal on June 2 and 6th. The initial date for launch was the day before, august 11th but it was scrubbed at T-1 min 55 sec. Some of the best images of these launches are now taken by amateurs. I usually post a few of the images, but this launch was different as most of those who placed their cameras just a few hundred feet from the rocket got very damaged equipment.

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.

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The Items Apollo 11 Left behind on the Moon

Aldrin Looks Back at Tranquility Base
Buzz Aldrin Looks Back at Tranquility Base just after deploying the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package (EASEP). Credit: NASA.

July 21st 1969. The time is 2:56 UTC, Neil Armstrong is taking the first steps on the moon, 20 minutes later Buzz Aldrin is following. The landing site looks clean apart from the big lander that is their lift home. By the end of the two hour EVA on the lunar surface the site would be walked over, science experiments laid out, and a pile of rubbish left in a pit. A view you don’t get to see in the images from Apollo 11, the astronauts left over 100 items on the lunar surface. Some commemorative, but mostly items they didn’t need for the return journey.

The plaque
The plaque attached to the lunar lander, with a message from all mankind, just in case some other being finds it. It commemorates the first steps on the Moon. Credit: NASA.

Famously landing in the sea of tranquillity, the Eagle lander has a number of official commemorative items attached to it. The main one is a plaque proclaiming “Here men from planet Earth first set foot upon the Moon. July 1969, A.D. We came in peace for all mankind.” Under the “we come in peace” is a golden replica of an olive branch. Nearby is a small aluminium capsule with a tiny Silicon disc inside. It contained on it messages from four US presidents, and seventy three other heads of state. It was sketched onto it in microscopic lettering, with the wording found here. There are also a few non official items taken there by the astronauts. An Apollo 1 patch in memory of Roger Chaffee, Gus Grissom, and Ed White who died in January 1967 in a fire inside the first Apollo capsule. They also left behind two military medals that belonged to Yuri Gagarin and Vladimir Komarov, both famous USSR cosmonauts. It showed the respect these men had for Soviet cosmonauts who had achieved so many firsts, and went through the same trials and tests they did.

The Apollo 1 patch
The patch for the famous Apollo 1 where Roger Chaffee, Gus Grissom, and Ed White tragically died in a fire. The patch was left on the Moon. Credit: NASA

On top of this they left the science experiments that they had used, such as the passive seismic experiment. The experiment that used meteorite impacts on the surface to map the inside structure of the Moon. They also placed a master reflector so that scientists could measure the distance from Earth precisely. This retroreflector still works, and if you have access to a powerful enough laser you can measure it yourself. They also had to pick up lots of moon rocks and moon dust as part of the science mission. They used sample scoops, scales and even a small hammer. There are also many specific tools that were needed, but were discarded before the return journey.

Map of Tranquillity base
Map of Tranquillity base including the Toss Zone where all the rubbish was discarded. Credit: NASA

Overall they left roughly 106 random bits if rubbish at the launch site. Including lots of tools like the hammers, chisel and brushes needed for sampling; astronaut EVA gear such as the over boots and and life support systems; and actual rubbish like the empty food bags, some armrests they wanted to dispose of; a TV camera; insulation blanket; pins and plastic covers for items like the flag (and the flag itself) plus the urine, defecation and sickness bags, although there is no word on whether they were used. They threw all the items into an area behind the lander known as the “Toss Zone”, basically just a rubbish pit.

Buzz with science
Buzz carrying science experiments to the required place slightly away from tranquility base. Credit: NASA

The astronauts left a surprisingly large amount of stuff on the Moon, but it does make sense, as they needed that weight to be replaced with the 300 kg of Moon rocks that they wanted to bring back, so they just left it all there. There is a full list of the items on this webpage, and its worth a look. Archived by the Lunar Legacy Project, they count it as over 106 items. Depending on how you count it, there can be over 116 items left by the Apollo Astronauts.

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.


The Secret Side of Sleepy North Devon and Cornwall

Barrel Rock Bude
Barrel Rock at the end of the Breakwater on Bude beach, used to guide ships into the harbour.

North Devon and Cornwall, a sleepy area that is full of history of its fishing and farming past. Now with a bustling influx of tourists every summer to enjoy the museums, adventure parks and sunny beaches. Just getting back from a holiday there in Appledore It has all these things, but the one big thing I noticed was the large presence of military sites in the area. Just visible from Appledore is RMB Chivenor, a big marine base, as well as a Babcock site that has built military ships for over 160 years. Just down the road is a selection of old RAF radar stations and airfields, one of which is now a top secret GCHQ site that could be listening to a large portion of the world’s internet traffic.

View From Bude
A view of one of the satellite dishes at GCHQ Bude taken from Bude beach. Credit: me.

On a day trip to Bude in Cornwall, after the customary ice cream we took a walk down the beach and were drawn to the Breakwater. More specifically a big rocky section at the end of the breakwater called Barrell Rock. Named so because of the barrel on the end of a long pole used to guide ships around the dangerous rocky breakwater. It gave a great view of the beach and bude itself,  and the chapel said to be where Bude originated. One thing I did notice when looking north up the coastline was what looked like a satellite dish, and that got me wondering. Then I remembered we passed a single signpost on the way pointing to GCHQ. It turns out that just 6km up the coastline is GCHQ Bude.

A view of GCHQ Bude
A great View of GCHQ from the coastal path. Credit: Paul Phillips

Nestled between the small villages of Morwenstow and Coombe, during the second World War the Air Force built RAF Cleave. It was designed to house target and target support aircraft for the firing ranges along the north cornwall coast. After the war it then stayed in government hands, with little use. Then in the 1960’s it started changing. The main reason: in 1962 a satellite receiving station was established at Goonhilly Downs, mainly for linking with television satellites, it also carried large amounts of telecommunications data. A surprisingly important piece of satellite communications infrastructure it has played a key role in communications events such as the Muhammad Ali fights, the Olympic Games, the Apollo 11 Moon landing, and 1985’s Live Aid concert. Being only 100km south of RAF Cleave signals could be intercepted by placing receiver dishes on the grounds. Initially to intercept mainly signals from Intelsat, a commercial communications satellite, the construction of the station began in 1969, with two 27m dishes, with smaller dishes coming after. Initially signposted as CTOS Morwenstow (CTOS standing for Composite Signals Organisation Station), in 2001 when a third large dish was built the station was renamed GCHQ Bude.

RAF Cleave gun emplacement
Remains of an RAF Cleave gun emplacement, with the modern satellite dishes of GCHQ Bude behind

GCHQ Bude has come under fire many times because of the ethical implications of the work conducted there. Even as early as 1963 they could have been tapping the data classed as suspicious from the TAT-3 telephone undersea cable. There are cable landing points at Widemouth bay that connect the UK to the USA, just 10 km south of the Cleave camp. It was also featured in a BBC Horizons documentary where it is claimed that all the data that goes through that the internet landing cable at Skewjack farm in Cornwall (formerly RAF Sennen) is sent on to GCHQ Bude for processing. The Fiber-Optic Link Around the Globe cable that surfaces there is estimated to see around 25% of all internet traffic, just think about that for a second. In terms of satellite installations at GCHQ Bude there are twenty one satellite antennae of differing sizes, three of which having a diameter of 30m. In theory these dishes could cover all the main frequency bands. Based on the position, some have theorised that they are oriented towards satellites of the INTELSAT, Intersputnik, and INMARSAT communications networks over the Atlantic Ocean, Africa, and the Indian Ocean, as well as towards the Middle East and mainland Europe. As well as this in 2011 a torus antenna was installed which is able to receive signals from up to thirty five satellites at once.

GCHQ Bude facing East
A wide image of GCHQ Bude facing east with a sunset in the background.

This post is not about my opinion about what they do at GCHQ but I find it a very interesting place, with a serious amount of technology involved, but they have been in the news a lot. A report made public in 2001 showed concerns by some EU member states that CTOS Morwenstow was involved in industrial espionage. It is claimed that the Intelligence Services Act 1994 grants GCHQ access to anything that emitted an electromagnetic signal, so pretty much any electronic device. In 2011 the Guardian reported how GCHQ attempted to gain access to the Blackberry Messenger service for the use of police to trawl for riot organisers. In 2013 the Guardian reported a large amount of information about GCHQ Bude leaked by Edward Snowden. It talked about operation Tempora, where GCHQ tapped into undersea cables and kept the data for up to 30 days to assess and analyse it. A further article reported that it was eavesdropping on charities, German government buildings, the Israeli Prime Minister, and an EU commissioner. There are plenty of other similar articles out there with similar overtones, and about GCHQ in general. The thing I found crazy is that even though trespassing on the site is its own law, you can walk fairly close when going along the coastal path.

RAF Hartland Sign
A sign at one of the old radar stations at RAF Hartland Point, now used by the aviation authority. Credit: Exal66 on derelictplaces.co.uk

When researching this subject it can get into a deep pit of conspiracy, but the thing I enjoy the most is looking at old military installations. Just up the coast from Bude in the northwestern point of Devon is Hartland Point. We visited Hartland Quay (close by) and it is highly recommended for the views. Apart from the hundreds of shipwrecks along that coastline, a noticeable part of the view is the old radar station at the point. During World War 2 that was controlled by RAF Hartland Point. The foundations of the big type 11, 13 and 14 radars can still be seen around the radar station at the point. Great information about the radar systems and some more information about the base can be found here. There is also an old air raid shelter, and a former station building that has been commandeered by the coastguard. The radar that can be seen nearby (the spherical one) is used by the UK Civil Aviation Agency for air traffic control. A user on derelictplaces.co.uk shows some great images of his walk around the site.

RAF Hartland base
The base of a radar from WW2 at what was RAF Hartland point. The aviation authorities new radar is in the background. Credit Exal66 on derelictplaces.co.uk

The final place I want to mention is one that is very noticable to anyone who has called the Tarka Trail between Fremington and Bideford. It passes right across the river from the historical Appledore shipbuilders. With many owners and names in the 160 years it has been active, it is now owned and operated by Babcock international Ltd, the same company who run Devonport. The dockyard has built more than 350 vessels in its lifetime, including small and medium-sized military craft, as well as superyachts, bulk carriers, ferries and oil/LPG industry vessels. While we were there a Norwegian military ship was being worked on. Some of the most notable ships include HMS Echo, HMS Enterprise, HMS Scott, and RRS Charles Darwin. A trip down the Tarka Trail is highly recommended, especially by bike.

Appledore Babcock
The shipbuilders at Appledore, now owned and run by Babcock international, visible by the Tarka Trail.

Thank you for reading, take a look at my other posts if you are interested in space, electronics, or military history. If you are interested, follow me on Twitter to get updates on projects I am currently working on.